William Shakespeare

Carpe Diem – William Shakespeare

Carpe Diem – William Shakespeare

O mistress mine, where are you roaming? O stay and hear! your true-love’s coming That can sing both high and low; Trip no further, pretty sweeting, Journey’s end in lovers’ meeting– Every wise man’s son doth know. What is love? ’tis not hereafter; Present mirth ha...

Bridal Song – William Shakespeare

Bridal Song – William Shakespeare

ROSES, their sharp spines being gone, Not royal in their smells alone, But in their hue; Maiden pinks, of odour faint, Daisies smell-less, yet most quaint, And sweet thyme true; Primrose, firstborn child of Ver; Merry springtime’s harbinger, With her bells dim; Oxlips in their cradles growing,...

Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind – William Shakespeare

Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind – William Shakespeare

Blow, blow, thou winter wind Thou art not so unkind As man’s ingratitude; Thy tooth is not so keen, Because thou art not seen, Although thy breath be rude. Heigh-ho! sing, heigh-ho! unto the green holly: Most freindship if feigning, most loving mere folly: Then heigh-ho, the holly! This life i...

Aubade – William Shakespeare

Aubade – William Shakespeare

HARK! hark! the lark at heaven’s gate sings, And Phoebus ‘gins arise, His steeds to water at those springs On chaliced flowers that lies; And winking Mary-buds begin To ope their golden eyes: With everything that pretty bin, My lady sweet, arise! Arise, arise! ~ Aubade – William Sh...

A Lover’s Complaint – William Shakespeare

A Lover’s Complaint – William Shakespeare

FROM off a hill whose concave womb reworded A plaintful story from a sistering vale, My spirits to attend this double voice accorded, And down I laid to list the sad-tuned tale; Ere long espied a fickle maid full pale, Tearing of papers, breaking rings a-twain, Storming her world with sorrow’s...

 A Fairy Song – William Shakespeare

 A Fairy Song – William Shakespeare

Over hill, over dale, Thorough bush, thorough brier, Over park, over pale, Thorough flood, thorough fire! I do wander everywhere, Swifter than the moon’s sphere; And I serve the Fairy Queen, To dew her orbs upon the green; The cowslips tall her pensioners be; In their gold coats spots you see;...

Complete Collection of Shakespeare’s Sonnets

Complete Collection of Shakespeare’s Sonnets

Complete Collection of Shakespeare’s Sonnets RumiBalkhi.Com From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty’s rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory: But thou contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed’st t...

From Fairest Creatures We Desire Increase By William Shakespeare

From Fairest Creatures We Desire Increase By William Shakespeare

From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty’s rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory: But thou contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed’st thy light’s flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine...

Against That Time If Ever That Time Come By William Shakespeare

Against That Time If Ever That Time Come By William Shakespeare

Against that time, if ever that time come, When I shall see thee frown on my defects, When as thy love hath cast his utmost sum, Called to that audit by advis’d respects; Against that time when thou shalt strangely pass, And scarcely greet me with that sun, thine eye, When love, converted from the t...

Let Those Who Are In Favour With Their Stars By William Shakespeare

Let Those Who Are In Favour With Their Stars By William Shakespeare

Let those who are in favour with their stars Of public honour and proud titles boast, Whilst I, whom fortune of such triumph bars Unlook’d for joy in that I honour most. Great princes’ favourites their fair leaves spread But as the marigold at the sun’s eye, And in themselves their pride lies buried...

O! How Thy Worth With Manners May I Sing By William Shakespeare

O! How Thy Worth With Manners May I Sing By William Shakespeare

O! how thy worth with manners may I sing, When thou art all the better part of me? What can mine own praise to mine own self bring? And what is’t but mine own when I praise thee? Even for this, let us divided live, And our dear love lose name of single one, That by this separation I may give That du...

So Shall I Live Supposing Thou Art True By William Shakespeare

So Shall I Live Supposing Thou Art True By William Shakespeare

So shall I live, supposing thou art true, Like a deceived husband; so love’s face May still seem love to me, though altered new; Thy looks with me, thy heart in other place: For there can live no hatred in thine eye, Therefore in that I cannot know thy change. In many’s looks, the false heart’s hist...

When Most I Wink Then Do Mine Eyes Best See By William Shakespeare

When Most I Wink Then Do Mine Eyes Best See By William Shakespeare

When most I wink, then do mine eyes best see, For all the day they view things unrespected; But when I sleep, in dreams they look on thee, And darkly bright, are bright in dark directed. Then thou, whose shadow shadows doth make bright, How would thy shadow’s form form happy show To the clear day wi...

For Shame Deny That Thou Bear’st Love To Any By William Shakespeare

For Shame Deny That Thou Bear’st Love To Any By William Shakespeare

For shame deny that thou bear’st love to any, Who for thy self art so unprovident. Grant, if thou wilt, thou art beloved of many, But that thou none lov’st is most evident: For thou art so possessed with murderous hate, That ‘gainst thy self thou stick’st not to conspire, Seeking that beauteous roof...

Mine Eye Hath Played The Painter And Hath Steeled By William Shakespeare

Mine Eye Hath Played The Painter And Hath Steeled By William Shakespeare

Mine eye hath played the painter and hath steeled, Thy beauty’s form in table of my heart; My body is the frame wherein ’tis held, And perspective that is best painter’s art. For through the painter must you see his skill, To find where your true image pictured lies, Which in my bosom’s shop is hang...

Since Brass Nor Stone Nor Earth Nor Boundless Sea By William Shakespeare

Since Brass Nor Stone Nor Earth Nor Boundless Sea By William Shakespeare

Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea, But sad mortality o’ersways their power, How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea, Whose action is no stronger than a flower? O! how shall summer’s honey breath hold out, Against the wrackful siege of battering days, When rocks impregnable are...

Thy Gift Thy Tables Are Within My Brain By William Shakespeare

Thy Gift Thy Tables Are Within My Brain By William Shakespeare

Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brain Full charactered with lasting memory, Which shall above that idle rank remain, Beyond all date, even to eternity: Or, at the least, so long as brain and heart Have faculty by nature to subsist; Till each to razed oblivion yield his part Of thee, thy record n...

When To The Sessions Of Sweet Silent Thought By William Shakespeare

When To The Sessions Of Sweet Silent Thought By William Shakespeare

When to the sessions of sweet silent thought I summon up remembrance of things past, I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought, And with old woes new wail my dear time’s waste: Then can I drown an eye, unused to flow, For precious friends hid in death’s dateless night, And weep afresh love’s long sin...

Cupid Laid By His Brand And Fell Asleep By William Shakespeare

Cupid Laid By His Brand And Fell Asleep By William Shakespeare

Cupid laid by his brand and fell asleep A maid of Dian’s this advantage found, And his love-kindling fire did quickly steep In a cold valley-fountain of that ground; Which borrowed from this holy fire of Love, A dateless lively heat, still to endure, And grew a seething bath, which yet men prove Aga...

As A Decrepit Father Takes Delight By William Shakespeare

As A Decrepit Father Takes Delight By William Shakespeare

As a decrepit father takes delight To see his active child do deeds of youth, So I, made lame by Fortune’s dearest spite, Take all my comfort of thy worth and truth; For whether beauty, birth, or wealth, or wit, Or any of these all, or all, or more, Entitled in thy parts, do crowned sit, I make my l...

Not From The Stars Do I My Judgement Pluck By William Shakespeare

Not From The Stars Do I My Judgement Pluck By William Shakespeare

Not from the stars do I my judgement pluck; And yet methinks I have Astronomy, But not to tell of good or evil luck, Of plagues, of dearths, or seasons’ quality; Nor can I fortune to brief minutes tell, Pointing to each his thunder, rain and wind, Or say with princes if it shall go well By oft predi...

Mine Eye And Heart Are At A Mortal War By William Shakespeare

Mine Eye And Heart Are At A Mortal War By William Shakespeare

Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war, How to divide the conquest of thy sight; Mine eye my heart thy picture’s sight would bar, My heart mine eye the freedom of that right. My heart doth plead that thou in him dost lie, A closet never pierced with crystal eyes, But the defendant doth that plea den...

Thus Is His Cheek The Map Of Days Outworn By William Shakespeare

Thus Is His Cheek The Map Of Days Outworn By William Shakespeare

Thus is his cheek the map of days outworn, When beauty lived and died as flowers do now, Before these bastard signs of fair were born, Or durst inhabit on a living brow; Before the golden tresses of the dead, The right of sepulchres, were shorn away, To live a second life on second head; Ere beauty’...

Devouring Time Blunt Thou The Lion’s Paws By William Shakespeare

Devouring Time Blunt Thou The Lion’s Paws By William Shakespeare

Devouring Time, blunt thou the lion’s paws, And make the earth devour her own sweet brood; Pluck the keen teeth from the fierce tiger’s jaws, And burn the long-lived phoenix in her blood; Make glad and sorry seasons as thou fleet’st, And do whate’er thou wilt, swift-footed Time, To the wide world an...

Let Not My Love Be Called Idolatry By William Shakespeare

Let Not My Love Be Called Idolatry By William Shakespeare

Let not my love be called idolatry, Nor my beloved as an idol show, Since all alike my songs and praises be To one, of one, still such, and ever so. Kind is my love to-day, to-morrow kind, Still constant in a wondrous excellence; Therefore my verse to constancy confined, One thing expressing, leaves...

O! How Much More Doth Beauty Beauteous Seem By William Shakespeare

O! How Much More Doth Beauty Beauteous Seem By William Shakespeare

O! how much more doth beauty beauteous seem By that sweet ornament which truth doth give. The rose looks fair, but fairer we it deem For that sweet odour, which doth in it live. The canker blooms have full as deep a dye As the perfumed tincture of the roses, Hang on such thorns, and play as wantonly...

Thine Eyes I Love And They As Pitying Me By William Shakespeare

Thine Eyes I Love And They As Pitying Me By William Shakespeare

Thine eyes I love, and they, as pitying me, Knowing thy heart torments me with disdain, Have put on black and loving mourners be, Looking with pretty ruth upon my pain. And truly not the morning sun of heaven Better becomes the grey cheeks of the east, Nor that full star that ushers in the even, Dot...

When I Consider Every Thing That Grows By William Shakespeare

When I Consider Every Thing That Grows By William Shakespeare

When I consider every thing that grows Holds in perfection but a little moment, That this huge stage presenteth nought but shows Whereon the stars in secret influence comment; When I perceive that men as plants increase, Cheered and checked even by the self-same sky, Vaunt in their youthful sap, at ...

Full Many A Glorious Morning Have I Seen By William Shakespeare

Full Many A Glorious Morning Have I Seen By William Shakespeare

Full many a glorious morning have I seen Flatter the mountain tops with sovereign eye, Kissing with golden face the meadows green, Gilding pale streams with heavenly alchemy; Anon permit the basest clouds to ride With ugly rack on his celestial face, And from the forlorn world his visage hide, Steal...

Love Is Too Young To Know What Conscience Is By William Shakespeare

Love Is Too Young To Know What Conscience Is By William Shakespeare

Love is too young to know what conscience is, Yet who knows not conscience is born of love? Then, gentle cheater, urge not my amiss, Lest guilty of my faults thy sweet self prove: For, thou betraying me, I do betray My nobler part to my gross body’s treason; My soul doth tell my body that he may Tri...

So Are You To My Thoughts As Food To Life By William Shakespeare

So Are You To My Thoughts As Food To Life By William Shakespeare

So are you to my thoughts as food to life, Or as sweet-season’d showers are to the ground; And for the peace of you I hold such strife As ‘twixt a miser and his wealth is found. Now proud as an enjoyer, and anon Doubting the filching age will steal his treasure; Now counting best to be with you alon...

So Now I Have Confessed That He Is Thine By William Shakespeare

So Now I Have Confessed That He Is Thine By William Shakespeare

So now I have confessed that he is thine, And I my self am mortgaged to thy will, Myself I’ll forfeit, so that other mine Thou wilt restore to be my comfort still: But thou wilt not, nor he will not be free, For thou art covetous, and he is kind; He learned but surety-like to write for me, Under tha...

Whoever Hath Her Wish Thou Hast Thy Will By William Shakespeare

Whoever Hath Her Wish Thou Hast Thy Will By William Shakespeare

Whoever hath her wish, thou hast thy Will, And Will to boot, and Will in over-plus; More than enough am I that vexed thee still, To thy sweet will making addition thus. Wilt thou, whose will is large and spacious, Not once vouchsafe to hide my will in thine? Shall will in others seem right gracious,...

If There Be Nothing New But That Which Is By William Shakespeare

If There Be Nothing New But That Which Is By William Shakespeare

If there be nothing new, but that which is Hath been before, how are our brains beguil’d, Which labouring for invention bear amiss The second burthen of a former child. Oh that record could with a backward look, Even of five hundred courses of the sun, Show me your image in some antique book, Since ...

I Grant Thou Wert Not Married To My Muse By William Shakespeare

I Grant Thou Wert Not Married To My Muse By William Shakespeare

I grant thou wert not married to my Muse, And therefore mayst without attaint o’erlook The dedicated words which writers use Of their fair subject, blessing every book. Thou art as fair in knowledge as in hue, Finding thy worth a limit past my praise; And therefore art enforced to seek anew Some fre...

Not Marble Nor The Gilded Monuments By William Shakespeare

Not Marble Nor The Gilded Monuments By William Shakespeare

Not marble, nor the gilded monuments Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme; But you shall shine more bright in these contents Than unswept stone, besmear’d with sluttish time. When wasteful war shall statues overturn, And broils root out the work of masonry, Nor Mars his sword, nor war’s qui...

That Thou Hast Her It Is Not All My Grief By William Shakespeare

That Thou Hast Her It Is Not All My Grief By William Shakespeare

That thou hast her it is not all my grief, And yet it may be said I loved her dearly; That she hath thee is of my wailing chief, A loss in love that touches me more nearly. Loving offenders thus I will excuse ye: Thou dost love her, because thou know’st I love her; And for my sake even so doth she a...

What Potions Have I Drunk Of Siren Tears By William Shakespeare

What Potions Have I Drunk Of Siren Tears By William Shakespeare

What potions have I drunk of Siren tears, Distilled from limbecks foul as hell within, Applying fears to hopes, and hopes to fears, Still losing when I saw myself to win! What wretched errors hath my heart committed, Whilst it hath thought itself so blessed never! How have mine eyes out of their sph...

But Do Thy Worst To Steal Thyself Away By William Shakespeare

But Do Thy Worst To Steal Thyself Away By William Shakespeare

But do thy worst to steal thyself away, For term of life thou art assured mine; And life no longer than thy love will stay, For it depends upon that love of thine. Then need I not to fear the worst of wrongs, When in the least of them my life hath end. I see a better state to me belongs Than that wh...

Like As The Waves Make Towards The Pebbled Shore By William Shakespeare

Like As The Waves Make Towards The Pebbled Shore By William Shakespeare

Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, So do our minutes hasten to their end; Each changing place with that which goes before, In sequent toil all forwards do contend. Nativity, once in the main of light, Crawls to maturity, wherewith being crown’d, Crooked eclipses ‘gainst his glory figh...

O! That You Were Your Self But Love You Are By William Shakespeare

O! That You Were Your Self But Love You Are By William Shakespeare

O! that you were your self; but, love, you are No longer yours, than you your self here live: Against this coming end you should prepare, And your sweet semblance to some other give: So should that beauty which you hold in lease Find no determination; then you were Yourself again, after yourself’s d...

Those Hours That With Gentle Work Did Frame By William Shakespeare

Those Hours That With Gentle Work Did Frame By William Shakespeare

Those hours, that with gentle work did frame The lovely gaze where every eye doth dwell, Will play the tyrants to the very same And that unfair which fairly doth excel; For never-resting time leads summer on To hideous winter, and confounds him there; Sap checked with frost, and lusty leaves quite g...

When Thou Shalt Be Disposed To Set Me Light By William Shakespeare

When Thou Shalt Be Disposed To Set Me Light By William Shakespeare

When thou shalt be disposed to set me light, And place my merit in the eye of scorn, Upon thy side, against myself I’ll fight, And prove thee virtuous, though thou art forsworn. With mine own weakness being best acquainted, Upon thy part I can set down a story Of faults concealed, wherein I am attai...

Beshrew That Heart That Makes My Heart To Groan By William Shakespeare

Beshrew That Heart That Makes My Heart To Groan By William Shakespeare

Beshrew that heart that makes my heart to groan For that deep wound it gives my friend and me! Is’t not enough to torture me alone, But slave to slavery my sweet’st friend must be? Me from myself thy cruel eye hath taken, And my next self thou harder hast engrossed: Of him, myself, and thee I am for...

Music To Hear Why Hear’st Thou Music Sadly By William Shakespeare

Music To Hear Why Hear’st Thou Music Sadly By William Shakespeare

Music to hear, why hear’st thou music sadly Sweets with sweets war not, joy delights in joy: Why lov’st thou that which thou receiv’st not gladly, Or else receiv’st with pleasure thine annoy? If the true concord of well-tuned sounds, By unions married, do offend thine ear, They do but sweetly chide ...

Since I Left You Mine Eye Is In My Mind By William Shakespeare

Since I Left You Mine Eye Is In My Mind By William Shakespeare

Since I left you, mine eye is in my mind; And that which governs me to go about Doth part his function and is partly blind, Seems seeing, but effectually is out; For it no form delivers to the heart Of bird, of flower, or shape which it doth latch: Of his quick objects hath the mind no part, Nor his...

Tired With All These For Restful Death I Cry By William Shakespeare

Tired With All These For Restful Death I Cry By William Shakespeare

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry, As to behold desert a beggar born, And needy nothing trimm’d in jollity, And purest faith unhappily forsworn, And gilded honour shamefully misplaced, And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted, And right perfection wrongfully disgraced, And strength by limping...

Accuse Me Thus That I Have Scanted All By William Shakespeare

Accuse Me Thus That I Have Scanted All By William Shakespeare

Accuse me thus that I have scanted all, Wherein I should your great deserts repay, Forgot upon your dearest love to call, Whereto all bonds do tie me day by day; That I have frequent been with unknown minds, And given to time your own dear-purchased right; That I have hoisted sail to all the winds W...

Farewell! Thou Art Too Dear For My Possessing By William Shakespeare

Farewell! Thou Art Too Dear For My Possessing By William Shakespeare

Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing, And like enough thou know’st thy estimate, The charter of thy worth gives thee releasing; My bonds in thee are all determinate. For how do I hold thee but by thy granting? And for that riches where is my deserving? The cause of this fair gift in me is w...

O Truant Muse What Shall Be Thy Amends By William Shakespeare

O Truant Muse What Shall Be Thy Amends By William Shakespeare

O truant Muse what shall be thy amends For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed? Both truth and beauty on my love depends; So dost thou too, and therein dignified. Make answer Muse: wilt thou not haply say, ‘Truth needs no colour, with his colour fixed; Beauty no pencil, beauty’s truth to lay; But be...

That Time Of Year Thou Mayst In Me Behold By William Shakespeare

That Time Of Year Thou Mayst In Me Behold By William Shakespeare

That time of year thou mayst in me behold When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. In me thou see’st the twilight of such day As after sunset fadeth in the west; Which by and by black night doth ...

When Forty Winters Shall Besiege Thy Brow By William Shakespeare

When Forty Winters Shall Besiege Thy Brow By William Shakespeare

When forty winters shall besiege thy brow, And dig deep trenches in thy beauty’s field, Thy youth’s proud livery so gazed on now, Will be a totter’d weed of small worth held: Then being asked, where all thy beauty lies, Where all the treasure of thy lusty days; To say, within thine own deep sunken e...

If Thou Survive My Well-Contented Day By William Shakespeare

If Thou Survive My Well-Contented Day By William Shakespeare

If thou survive my well-contented day, When that churl Death my bones with dust shall cover And shalt by fortune once more re-survey These poor rude lines of thy deceased lover, Compare them with the bett’ring of the time, And though they be outstripped by every pen, Reserve them for my love, not fo...

Like As To Make Our Appetites More Keen By William Shakespeare

Like As To Make Our Appetites More Keen By William Shakespeare

Like as, to make our appetites more keen, With eager compounds we our palate urge; As, to prevent our maladies unseen, We sicken to shun sickness when we purge; Even so, being full of your ne’er-cloying sweetness, To bitter sauces did I frame my feeding; And, sick of welfare, found a kind of meetnes...

O! Lest The World Should Task You To Recite By William Shakespeare

O! Lest The World Should Task You To Recite By William Shakespeare

O! lest the world should task you to recite What merit lived in me, that you should love After my death,–dear love, forget me quite, For you in me can nothing worthy prove. Unless you would devise some virtuous lie, To do more for me than mine own desert, And hang more praise upon deceased I Than ni...

Those Lines That I Before Have Writ Do Lie By William Shakespeare

Those Lines That I Before Have Writ Do Lie By William Shakespeare

Those lines that I before have writ do lie, Even those that said I could not love you dearer: Yet then my judgment knew no reason why My most full flame should afterwards burn clearer. But reckoning Time, whose million’d accidents Creep in ‘twixt vows, and change decrees of kings, Tan sacred beauty,...

Whilst I Alone Did Call Upon Thy Aid By William Shakespeare

Whilst I Alone Did Call Upon Thy Aid By William Shakespeare

Whilst I alone did call upon thy aid, My verse alone had all thy gentle grace; But now my gracious numbers are decayed, And my sick Muse doth give an other place. I grant, sweet love, thy lovely argument Deserves the travail of a worthier pen; Yet what of thee thy poet doth invent He robs thee of, a...

How Oft When Thou My Music Music Play’st By William Shakespeare

How Oft When Thou My Music Music Play’st By William Shakespeare

How oft when thou, my music, music play’st, Upon that blessed wood whose motion sounds With thy sweet fingers when thou gently sway’st The wiry concord that mine ear confounds, Do I envy those jacks that nimble leap, To kiss the tender inward of thy hand, Whilst my poor lips which should that harves...

My Love Is Strengthened Though More Weak In Seeming By William Shakespeare

My Love Is Strengthened Though More Weak In Seeming By William Shakespeare

My love is strengthened, though more weak in seeming; I love not less, though less the show appear; That love is merchandized, whose rich esteeming, The owner’s tongue doth publish every where. Our love was new, and then but in the spring, When I was wont to greet it with my lays; As Philomel in sum...

So Am I As The Rich Whose Blessed Key By William Shakespeare

So Am I As The Rich Whose Blessed Key By William Shakespeare

So am I as the rich, whose blessed key, Can bring him to his sweet up-locked treasure, The which he will not every hour survey, For blunting the fine point of seldom pleasure. Therefore are feasts so solemn and so rare, Since, seldom coming in the long year set, Like stones of worth they thinly plac...