Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin By Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin By Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin I. Mine eyes were dim with tears unshed; Yes, I was firm — thus wert not thou;– My baffled looks did fear yet dread To meet thy looks — I could not know How anxiously they sought to shine With soothing pity upon mine. II. To sit and curb the soul’... »

The Viewless And Invisible Consequence By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Viewless And Invisible Consequence By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Viewless And Invisible Consequence The viewless and invisible Consequence Watches thy goings-out, and comings-in, And…hovers o’er thy guilty sleep, Unveiling every new-born deed, and thoughts More ghastly than those deeds– Hits: 0 »

The Birth Place Of Pleasure By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Birth Place Of Pleasure By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Birth Place Of Pleasure At the creation of the Earth Pleasure, that divinest birth, From the soil of Heaven did rise, Wrapped in sweet wild melodies– Like an exhalation wreathing To the sound of air low-breathing Through Aeolian pines, which make A shade and shelter to the lake Whence it r... »

Song Rarely, Rarely, Comest Thou By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Song Rarely, Rarely, Comest Thou By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Song Rarely, Rarely, Comest Thou Rarely, rarely, comest thou, Spirit of Delight! Wherefore hast thou left me now Many a day and night? Many a weary night and day ‘Tis since thou are fled away. How shall ever one like me Win thee back again? With the joyous and the free Thou wilt scoff at pain.... »

Otho By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Otho By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Otho I. Thou wert not, Cassius, and thou couldst not be, Last of the Romans, though thy memory claim From Brutus his own glory–and on thee Rests the full splendour of his sacred fame: Nor he who dared make the foul tyrant quail Amid his cowering senate with thy name, Though thou and he were gr... »

Men Of England, By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Men Of England, By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Men of England, wherefore plough For the lords who lay ye low? Wherefore weave with toil and care The rich robes your tyrants wear? Wherefore feed and clothe and save, From the cradle to the grave, Those ungrateful drones who would Drain your sweat — nay, drink your blood? Wherefore, Bees of E... »

I Weep For Adonais -He By Percy Bysshe Shelley

I Weep For Adonais -He By Percy Bysshe Shelley

I weep for Adonais -he is dead! O, weep for Adonais! though our tears Thaw not the frost which binds so dear a head! And thou, sad Hour, selected from all years To mourn our loss, rouse thy obscure compeers, And teach them thine own sorrow, say: “With me Died Adonais; till the Future dares For... »

From The Greek Of Moschus By Percy Bysshe Shelley

From The Greek Of Moschus By Percy Bysshe Shelley

From The Greek Of Moschus Tan ala tan glaukan otan onemos atrema Balle–k.t.l. When winds that move not its calm surface sweep The azure sea, I love the land no more; The smiles of the serene and tranquil deep Tempt my unquiet mind.—But when the roar Of Ocean’s gray abyss resounds, and foam Gat... »

Fragment From The Wandering Jew By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Fragment From The Wandering Jew By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Fragment From The Wandering Jew The Elements respect their Maker’s seal! Still Like the scathed pine tree’s height, Braving the tempests of the night Have I ‘scaped the flickering flame. Like the scathed pine, which a monument stands Of faded grandeur, which the brands Of the tempe... »

Bereavement By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Bereavement By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Bereavement How stern are the woes of the desolate mourner As he bends in still grief o’er the hallowed bier, As enanguished he turns from the laugh of the scorner, And drops to perfection’s remembrance a tear; When floods of despair down his pale cheeks are streaming, When no blissful h... »

When The Lamp Is Shattered By Percy Bysshe Shelley

When The Lamp Is Shattered By Percy Bysshe Shelley

When The Lamp Is Shattered When the lamp is shattered, The light in the dust lies dead; When the cloud is scattered, The rainbow’s glory is shed; When the lute is broken, Sweet tones are remembered not; When the lips have spoken, Loved accents are soon forgot. As music and splendor Survive not... »

To Edward Williams By Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Edward Williams By Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Edward Williams I. The serpent is shut out from Paradise. The wounded deer must seek the herb no more In which its heart-cure lies: The widowed dove must cease to haunt a bower Like that from which its mate with feigned sighs Fled in the April hour. I too must seldom seek again Near happy friends... »

The Pale, The Cold, And By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Pale, The Cold, And By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The pale, the cold, and the moony smile Which the meteor beam of a starless night Sheds on a lonely and sea-girt isle, Ere the dawning of morn’s undoubted light, Is the flame of life so fickle and wan That flits round our steps till their strength is gone. O man! hold thee on in courage of sou... »

Stanza, Written At Bracknell By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Stanza, Written At Bracknell By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Stanza, Written At Bracknell Thy dewy looks sink in my breast; Thy gentle words stir poison there; Thou hast disturbed the only rest That was the portion of despair! Subdued to Duty’s hard control, I could have borne my wayward lot: The chains that bind this ruined soul Had cankered then—but crushed... »

Rosalind, Helen, And Her By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Rosalind, Helen, And Her By Percy Bysshe Shelley

ROSALIND, HELEN, and her Child. SCENE. The Shore of the Lake of Como. HELEN Come hither, my sweet Rosalind. ‘T is long since thou and I have met; And yet methinks it were unkind Those moments to forget. Come, sit by me. I see thee stand By this lone lake, in this far land, Thy loose hair in th... »

On Leaving London For Wales By Percy Bysshe Shelley

On Leaving London For Wales By Percy Bysshe Shelley

On Leaving London For Wales Hail to thee, Cambria! for the unfettered wind Which from thy wilds even now methinks I feel, Chasing the clouds that roll in wrath behind, And tightening the soul’s laxest nerves to steel; True mountain Liberty alone may heal The pain which Custom’s obduracie... »

Lines Written On Hearing The News Of The Death Of Napoleon By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Lines Written On Hearing The News Of The Death Of Napoleon By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Lines Written On Hearing The News Of The Death Of Napoleon What! alive and so bold, O Earth? Art thou not overbold? What! leapest thou forth as of old In the light of thy morning mirth, The last of the flock of the starry fold? Ha! leapest thou forth as of old? Are not the limbs still when the ghost... »

Hymn Of Pan By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Hymn Of Pan By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Hymn Of Pan FROM the forests and highlands We come, we come; From the river-girt islands, Where loud waves are dumb Listening to my sweet pipings. The wind in the reeds and the rushes, The bees on the bells of thyme, The birds on the myrtle-bushes, The cicale above in the lime, And the lizards below... »

Fragment Yes! All Is Past By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Fragment Yes! All Is Past By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Fragment Yes! All Is Past Yes! all is past–swift time has fled away, Yet its swell pauses on my sickening mind; How long will horror nerve this frame of clay? I’m dead, and lingers yet my soul behind. Oh! powerful Fate, revoke thy deadly spell, And yet that may not ever, ever be, Heaven will n... »

Extract From Poetical By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Extract From Poetical By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Extract from Poetical Essay by Percy Bysshe Shelley Millions to fight compell’d, to fight or die In mangled heaps on War’s red altar lie . . . When the legal murders swell the lists of pride; When glory’s views the titled idiot guide Lost Shelley poem found after 200 years http://w... »

And Like A Dying Lady, By Percy Bysshe Shelley

And Like A Dying Lady, By Percy Bysshe Shelley

And like a dying lady, lean and pale, Who totters forth, wrapp’d in a gauzy veil, Out of her chamber, led by the insane And feeble wanderings of her fading brain, The moon arose up in the murky East, A white and shapeless mass ~ And like a Dying Lady, Lean and Pale – Percy Bysshe Shelley... »

To The Nile By Percy Bysshe Shelley

To The Nile By Percy Bysshe Shelley

To The Nile Month after month the gathered rains descend Drenching yon secret Aethiopian dells, And from the desert’s ice-girt pinnacles Where Frost and Heat in strange embraces blend On Atlas, fields of moist snow half depend. Girt there with blasts and meteors Tempest dwells By Nile’s aereal urn, ... »

The Zucca By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Zucca By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Zucca I. Summer was dead and Autumn was expiring, And infant Winter laughed upon the land All cloudlessly and cold;–when I, desiring More in this world than any understand, Wept o’er the beauty, which, like sea retiring, Had left the earth bare as the wave-worn sand Of my lorn heart, and o... »

The Fountains Mingle By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Fountains Mingle By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The fountains mingle with the river And the rivers with the ocean, The winds of Heaven mix for ever With a sweet emotion; Nothing in the world is single, All things by a law divine In one spirit meet and mingle – Why not I with thine? See the mountains kiss high Heaven And the waves clasp one ... »

Sonnet  From The Italian Of Cavalcanti By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Sonnet From The Italian Of Cavalcanti By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Sonnet From The Italian Of Cavalcanti Returning from its daily quest, my Spirit Changed thoughts and vile in thee doth weep to find: It grieves me that thy mild and gentle mind Those ample virtues which it did inherit Has lost. Once thou didst loathe the multitude Of blind and madding men–I th... »

Queen Mab Part Iii. By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Queen Mab Part Iii. By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Queen Mab Part Iii. ‘Fairy!’ the Spirit said, And on the Queen of Spells Fixed her ethereal eyes, ‘I thank thee. Thou hast given A boon which I will not resign, and taught A lesson not to be unlearned. I know The past, and thence I will essay to glean A warning for the future, so t... »

O That A Chariot Of Cloud Were Mine! By Percy Bysshe Shelley

O That A Chariot Of Cloud Were Mine! By Percy Bysshe Shelley

O That A Chariot Of Cloud Were Mine! O that a chariot of cloud were mine! Of cloud which the wild tempest weaves in air, When the moon over the ocean’s line Is spreading the locks of her bright gray hair. O that a chariot of cloud were mine! 5 I would sail on the waves of the billowy wind To the mou... »

Lines — Far, Far Away, O Ye By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Lines — Far, Far Away, O Ye By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Lines — Far, Far Away, O Ye I. Far, far away, O ye Halcyons of Memory, Seek some far calmer nest Than this abandoned breast! No news of your false spring To my heart’s winter bring, Once having gone, in vain Ye come again. II. Vultures, who build your bowers High in the Future’s towers, Wither... »

Heigho! The Lark And The By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Heigho! The Lark And The By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Heigho! the lark and the owl! One flies the morning, and one lulls the night: Only the nightingale, poor fond soul, Sings like the fool through darkness and light. “A widow bird sate mourning for her love Upon a wintry bough; The frozen wind crept on above, The freezing stream below. “Th... »

Fragment Of The Elegy On The Death Of Bion By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Fragment Of The Elegy On The Death Of Bion By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Fragment Of The Elegy On The Death Of Bion From the Greek of Moschus. Ye Dorian woods and waves, lament aloud,– Augment your tide, O streams, with fruitless tears, For the beloved Bion is no more. Let every tender herb and plant and flower, From each dejected bud and drooping bloom, Shed dews ... »

Dirge For The Year By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Dirge For The Year By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Dirge For The Year I. Orphan Hours, the Year is dead, Come and sigh, come and weep! Merry Hours, smile instead, For the Year is but asleep. See, it smiles as it is sleeping, Mocking your untimely weeping. II. As an earthquake rocks a corse In its coffin in the clay, So White Winter, that rough nurse... »

A Roman’s Chamber By Percy Bysshe Shelley

A Roman’s Chamber By Percy Bysshe Shelley

A Roman’s Chamber I. In the cave which wild weeds cover Wait for thine aethereal lover; For the pallid moon is waning, O’er the spiral cypress hanging And the moon no cloud is staining. II. It was once a Roman’s chamber, Where he kept his darkest revels, And the wild weeds twine and clam... »

To Mary Who Died In This Opinion By Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Mary Who Died In This Opinion By Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Mary Who Died In This Opinion I. Maiden, quench the glare of sorrow Struggling in thine haggard eye: Firmness dare to borrow From the wreck of destiny; For the ray morn’s bloom revealing Can never boast so bright an hue As that which mocks concealing, And sheds its loveliest light on you. II. Yet... »

The Triumph Of Life By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Triumph Of Life By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Triumph Of Life Swift as a spirit hastening to his task Of glory & of good, the Sun sprang forth Rejoicing in his splendour, & the mask Of darkness fell from the awakened Earth. The smokeless altars of the mountain snows Flamed above crimson clouds, & at the birth Of light, the Oc... »

The Boat On The Serchio By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Boat On The Serchio By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Boat On The Serchio Our boat is asleep on Serchio’s stream, Its sails are folded like thoughts in a dream, The helm sways idly, hither and thither; Dominic, the boatman, has brought the mast, And the oars, and the sails; but ’tis sleeping fast, Like a beast, unconscious of its tether. The ... »

Song Of Proserpine While Gathering Flowers On The Plain Of Enna By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Song Of Proserpine While Gathering Flowers On The Plain Of Enna By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Song Of Proserpine While Gathering Flowers On The Plain Of Enna Sacred Goddess, Mother Earth, Thou from whose immortal bosom Gods and men and beasts have birth, Leaf and blade, and bud and blossom, Breathe thine influence most divine On thine own child, Proserpine. If with mists of evening dew Thou ... »

Ozymandias By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Ozymandias By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Ozymandias I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: `Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survi... »

Melody To A Scene Of Former Times By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Melody To A Scene Of Former Times By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Melody To A Scene Of Former Times Art thou indeed forever gone, Forever, ever, lost to me? Must this poor bosom beat alone, Or beat at all, if not for thee? Ah! why was love to mortals given, To lift them to the height of Heaven, Or dash them to the depths of Hell? Yet I do not reproach thee, dear! ... »

I Stood Upon A Heaven-Cleaving Turret By Percy Bysshe Shelley

I Stood Upon A Heaven-Cleaving Turret By Percy Bysshe Shelley

I Stood Upon A Heaven-Cleaving Turret I stood upon a heaven-cleaving turret Which overlooked a wide Metropolis– And in the temple of my heart my Spirit Lay prostrate, and with parted lips did kiss The dust of Desolations [altar] hearth– And with a voice too faint to falter It shook that ... »

From The Greek Of Moschus  Pan Loved His Neighbour Echo By Percy Bysshe Shelley

From The Greek Of Moschus Pan Loved His Neighbour Echo By Percy Bysshe Shelley

From The Greek Of Moschus Pan Loved His Neighbour Echo Pan loved his neighbour Echo–but that child Of Earth and Air pined for the Satyr leaping; The Satyr loved with wasting madness wild The bright nymph Lyda,–and so three went weeping. As Pan loved Echo, Echo loved the Satyr, The Satyr,... »

Fragment Follow To The Deep Wood’s Weeds By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Fragment Follow To The Deep Wood’s Weeds By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Fragment Follow To The Deep Wood’s Weeds Follow to the deep wood’s weeds, Follow to the wild-briar dingle, Where we seek to intermingle, And the violet tells her tale To the odour-scented gale, For they two have enough to do Of such work as I and you. Hits: 0 »

Away! The Moor Is Dark By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Away! The Moor Is Dark By Percy Bysshe Shelley

AWAY! the moor is dark beneath the moon, Rapid clouds have drunk the last pale beam of even: Away! the gathering winds will call the darkness soon, And profoundest midnight shroud the serene lights of heaven. Pause not! the time is past! Every voice cries, ‘Away!’ Tempt not with one last... »

When Soft Winds And Sunny Skies By Percy Bysshe Shelley

When Soft Winds And Sunny Skies By Percy Bysshe Shelley

When Soft Winds And Sunny Skies When soft winds and sunny skies With the green earth harmonize, And the young and dewy dawn, Bold as an unhunted fawn, Up the windless heaven is gone,– Laugh—for ambushed in the day,– Clouds and whirlwinds watch their prey. Hits: 1 »

Unfathomable Sea! Whose By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Unfathomable Sea! Whose By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Unfathomable Sea! whose waves are years, Ocean of Time, whose waters of deep woe Are brackish with the salt of human tears! Thou shoreless flood, which in thy ebb and flow Claspest the limits of mortality, And sick of prey, yet howling on for more, Vomitest thy wrecks on its inhospitable shore; Trea... »

To Emilia Viviani By Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Emilia Viviani By Percy Bysshe Shelley

To Emilia Viviani I. Madonna, wherefore hast thou sent to me Sweet-basil and mignonette? Embleming love and health, which never yet In the same wreath might be. Alas, and they are wet! Is it with thy kisses or thy tears? For never rain or dew Such fragrance drew From plant or flower—the very doubt e... »

The Past By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Past By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Past I. Wilt thou forget the happy hours Which we buried in Love’s sweet bowers, Heaping over their corpses cold Blossoms and leaves, instead of mould? Blossoms which were the joys that fell, And leaves, the hopes that yet remain. II. Forget the dead, the past? Oh, yet There are ghosts that may ... »

Stanza From A Translation Of The Marseillaise Hymn By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Stanza From A Translation Of The Marseillaise Hymn By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Stanza From A Translation Of The Marseillaise Hymn Tremble, Kings despised of man! Ye traitors to your Country, Tremble! Your parricidal plan At length shall meet its destiny… We all are soldiers fit to fight, But if we sink in glory’s night Our mother Earth will give ye new The brillian... »

Rosalind And Helen A Modern Eclogue By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Rosalind And Helen A Modern Eclogue By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Rosalind And Helen A Modern Eclogue ROSALIND, HELEN, and her Child. SCENE. The Shore of the Lake of Como. HELEN Come hither, my sweet Rosalind. ‘T is long since thou and I have met; And yet methinks it were unkind Those moments to forget. Come, sit by me. I see thee stand By this lone lake, in... »

On Fanny Godwin By Percy Bysshe Shelley

On Fanny Godwin By Percy Bysshe Shelley

On Fanny Godwin Her voice did quiver as we parted, Yet knew I not that heart was broken From which it came, and I departed Heeding not the words then spoken. Misery–O Misery, This world is all too wide for thee. Hits: 0 »

Lines Written In The Vale Of Chamouni By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Lines Written In The Vale Of Chamouni By Percy Bysshe Shelley

(Lines written in the Vale of Chamouni) 1 The everlasting universe of things Flows through the mind, and rolls its rapid waves, Now dark – now glittering – now reflecting gloom – Now lending splendor, where from secret springs The source of human thought its tribute brings Of water... »

Hymn Of Apollo By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Hymn Of Apollo By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Hymn Of Apollo I. The sleepless Hours who watch me as I lie, Curtained with star-inwoven tapestries, From the broad moonlight of the sky, Fanning the busy dreams from my dim eyes,– Waken me when their Mother, the gray Dawn, Tells them that dreams and that the moon is gone. II. Then I arise, an... »

Fragment What Men Gain Fairly By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Fragment What Men Gain Fairly By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Fragment What Men Gain Fairly What men gain fairly — that they should possess, And children may inherit idleness, From him who earns it—This is understood; Private injustice may be general good. But he who gains by base and armed wrong, Or guilty fraud, or base compliances, May be despoiled; e... »

Evening. To Harriet By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Evening. To Harriet By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Evening. To Harriet O thou bright Sun! beneath the dark blue line Of western distance that sublime descendest, And, gleaming lovelier as thy beams decline, Thy million hues to every vapour lendest, And, over cobweb lawn and grove and stream Sheddest the liquid magic of thy light, Till calm Earth, wi... »

An Old, Mad, Blind, By Percy Bysshe Shelley

An Old, Mad, Blind, By Percy Bysshe Shelley

An old, mad, blind, despised, and dying king,– Princes, the dregs of their dull race, who Through public scorn,–mud from a muddy spring,– Rulers who neither see, nor feel, nor know, But leech-like to their fainting country cling, Till they drop, blind in blood, without a blow,̵... »

To The Moonbeam By Percy Bysshe Shelley

To The Moonbeam By Percy Bysshe Shelley

To The Moonbeam I. Moonbeam, leave the shadowy vale, To bathe this burning brow. Moonbeam, why art thou so pale, As thou walkest o’er the dewy dale, Where humble wild-flowers grow? Is it to mimic me? But that can never be; For thine orb is bright, And the clouds are light, That at intervals sh... »

The World’s Great Age By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The World’s Great Age By Percy Bysshe Shelley

THE world’s great age begins anew, The golden years return, The earth doth like a snake renew Her winter weeds outworn; Heaven smiles, and faiths and empires gleam Like wrecks of a dissolving dream. A brighter Hellas rears its mountains From waves serener far; A new Peneus rolls his fountains ... »

The Fugitives By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Fugitives By Percy Bysshe Shelley

The Fugitives I. The waters are flashing, The white hail is dashing, The lightnings are glancing, The hoar-spray is dancing— Away! The whirlwind is rolling, The thunder is tolling, The forest is swinging, The minster bells ringing– Come away! The Earth is like Ocean, Wreck-strewn and in motion... »

Song. Translated From The Italian By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Song. Translated From The Italian By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Song. Translated From The Italian Oh! what is the gain of restless care, And what is ambitious treasure? And what are the joys that the modish share, In their sickly haunts of pleasure? My husband’s repast with delight I spread, What though ’tis but rustic fare, May each guardian angel p... »

Queen Mab Part Iv. By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Queen Mab Part Iv. By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Queen Mab Part Iv. ‘How beautiful this night! the balmiest sigh, Which vernal zephyrs breathe in evening’s ear, Were discord to the speaking quietude That wraps this moveless scene. Heaven’s ebon vault, Studded with stars unutterably bright, Through which the moon’s unclouded... »

Night By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Night By Percy Bysshe Shelley

Night SWIFTLY walk o’er the western wave,    Spirit of Night! Out of the misty eastern cave,– Where, all the long and lone daylight, Thou wovest dreams of joy and fear Which make thee terrible and dear,–    Swift be thy flight! Wrap thy form in a mantle grey,    Star-inwrought! Bli... »